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To see a DNA study into my relationship with other Gordon lines follow this link. There is other information about possible source information for the Gordon surname.

I have moved the haplogroup I and DNA information to a new page. I wanted to make it smaller for a faster load up time.


I have decided to look into this a bit differently. I will follow the path of the Scotish Army that Alexander Gordon was part of. Perhaps this way I can discern his original home.

Prince Charles II Stuart lost a battle at Dunbar Scotland on September 3 1650. He was determined to place himself on the throne. After the loss at Dunbar, General David Leslie retreated to Stirling to regroup. While there he tried to recruit more men. John Middleton went to the Highlands to recruit more people into the Royalist Army. January 1 1651 Charles is crowned King of Scotland at Scone, then tours the unoccupied portions of his kingdom.

I assume that Alexander Gordon was part of this 14,000 man Army when it crossed the border into England on August 5 1651. He would have been in the occupying force that moved into Worchester on August 22 1651.

The Scots lost this battle Septemebr 3 1651. The Scots lost 3,000 men, and 10,000 were taken prisoner. Many of the captured scots were transported to New England as indentured servents.

I found this list of regiments that were involved in the Battle of Worcester. I do not know if it is complete, or if there is a list of individaul soldiers.

1. Aldie's Horse - raised from Penartshire
The above map shows some DNA trails. The red elipses are the Gordon areas. The blue elipses show the areas where people with relatively close DNA are from or originated. Gordons were first in Berwicksire, then they were granted lands in Aberdeeshire, and lastly the Low Land branch was granted lands in Kirkudbright. Some Gordons always stayed behind in the original localations.

The Gordon DNA page believes Alexander is attached to the William Gordon branch in the Low Lands. I can't really make any judgements. The William Gordon descendants are from the Kirkudbright area.

The genealogy searchers think Alexander was born in either Ayr or Aberdeen. Still no clues to a positive location.

2. James Wemyss of Caskiiesberrann ( artillery train) - Caskiiesberrann
3. The Master of Banff's Foot - Banffshire
4. The 2nd. Duke of Hamilton's Horse - Perthshire
5. The Duke of Hamilton's Horse - Clydesdale
6. Hamilton's Foot - Glasgow
7. Hamilton's Horse - Dumbartonshire
8. Master of Caithness Foot - Caithness
9. Lord Cranston's Horse - ?
10. Dalyell's Foot - ?
11. Douglas Foot - Tevoit/ Selkirk/ Eskdale
12. Lord Drummond's Horse - Perthshire
13. Lord Drummond's Foot - Perthshire
14. Earl of Errol's Horse - Kincardine - Aberdeen - Banffshire
15. Lord Eskine's Horse - Dumbarton - Stirling - Clackmarnock
16. Lord Forbe's Horse - Angus
17. Grant's Foot - Inverness
18. Master of Grey's Foot - Angus
19. Earl of Home's Horse - Berwickshire
20 Earl of Home's Foot - Berwickshire
21. Inne's Horse - Nairn - Moray - Inverness - Ross
22, Keith's Foot - Aberdeenshire - Banffshire
23. Earl of Kellie's Foot - Fife
24. Lord Kintail's Foot - ?
25. Tutor of MacLeod's Foot - Harris - Skye
26. Clan McGregor - ? Another web site states that 800 McGregors were killed at this battle.
27. Clan MacKey Foot - Strathnaver
28. Clan MacKinnon - Skye
29. Clan MacNab - Killin - Glen Dochart - Tyndrum
30 Macneil's Foot - Outer Hebrides
31. Clan MacRae - Kintail
32. Earl Marischall's Horse - Aberdeenshire - Banffshire
33. Massey's Horse - Fifeshire
34. Maule's Foot - Fifeshire
35. Maule's Horse - Fifeshire
36. Middleton's Horse - Aberdeen - Banff - Teviot - Selkirk - Peebes - Renfrew - Dumbarton - Bute
37. Viscount Montgomery's Horse - Ayrshire
39. Earl of Rothe's Horse - Fifeshire - Dumfermline
40. Rothiemay's Foot - Aberdeenshire
41. Sinclair's Foot - Angus
42. Sleat's Foot - Skye - Uist
43. Lord Spynie's Foot - Dundee
44. Toquhon's Foot - Stirling area
45. Urry's Horse - Aberdeenshire - Banffshire
46. Van Druschke's Horse - Stirling - Aberdeenshire - Banffshire

For what its worth Alexander Gordon was associated with a Bean and a Sinclair in New England, they are thought (by some) to be people he knew back in Scotland. Also notice there are no listings specificly for Clan Gordon participation. I will need to look into that too. It seems somewhat strange that there is no evidence of communication between Alexander Gordon and his family still in Scotland.??


This is the begining of documentated "Gordon" genealogy as it pertains to me.

Alexander GORDON and Mary LYSSON


  DNA, "Y" Chromosome, Segment; DYS#
Kit # Family
Dates, Location
or other
Pertinent
Information
H
a
p
l
o
g
r
o
u
p
3
9
3
3
9
0
1
9
3
9
1
3
8
5
a
3
8
5
b
4
2
6
3
8
8
4
3
9
3
8
9
|
1
3
9
2
3
8
9
|
2
4
5
8
4
5
9
a
4
5
9
b
4
5
5
4
5
4
4
4
7
4
3
7
4
4
8
4
4
9
4
6
4
a
4
6
4
b
4
6
4
c
4
6
4
d
4
6
0
G
A
T
A

H
4
Y
C
A

I
I

a
Y
C
A

I
I

b
4
5
6
6
0
7
5
7
6
5
7
0
C
D
Y

a
C
D
Y

b
4
4
2
4
3
8
Loci ---> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37
35965 Eliphalet Gordon 1758- NH> NY> MI> MT Predicted
I1a
13 23 14 10 14 15 11 14 11 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 21 29 11 14 14 16 10 10 19 21 14 14 17 19 37 38 12 10

Modal haplotype I1a-uN2

13 23 14 10 14 15 11 14 11 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 29 11 14 14 16 10 10 19 21 14 14 17 20 35 38 12 10

At this point in time we have a 12/12 a 36.5/37, and a 37/37 match up with other Alexander Gordon descendants. The 36.5 and 37 matches both descend through Thomas(6) Gordon born 1678.


My father says his father said that his father said?? That our first Gordon ancestor, in America, was captured by the British, suffered some mistreatment(treated like a common horse thief), and lastly was given a choice to "board a ship bound for America, or face execution in the morning." I guess he chose America.

Born approximately 1635, some researchers have his parentage as Alexander Gordon of Ayr Scotland. Another shows Thomas Gordon and Margaret Milne of Aberdeen, Scotland as his parentage. Thomas' parents are Archbald Gordon and Kattrin Cheyne. Perhaps he came from Morayshire.

The The UK Battlefields Resource Page. Has this to say about the Battle of Worcester. On Septamber 3 1651, roughly 12,000 Royalist, Scottish troops were holed up in the English town of Worcester. During the 10 hour battle 3,000 were killed and 7,000 taken prisoner.

The "History of England" by John Lingard. States, [Footnote 1: Whitelock, 509. Ludlow, i. 372. Heath, 301. Journals, Sept. 6, 9, 11, 19. ?Next day, 13th, the common prisoners were brought through Westminster to Tuthill fields?a sadder spectacle was never seen except the miserable place of their defeat?and there sold to several merchants, and sent to the Barbadoes."?Heath, 301. Fifteen hundred were granted as slaves to the Guinea merchants, and transported to the Gold Coast in Africa.?Parl. Hist. iii. 1374.]

October 15, 1652; A document witnessed by Goodman Blois, Richard Blois, Richard Norcras "Delivered by Alexander as his act and deed in presence of us underwritten to his master Goodman Stratton. Richard Norcross John Cloys" "We consent to the turning over of this Servant to Samuel Stratton the 19th of the 8 mo: 1652 Increase Nowell William Hibbins

1653; A petition of Alexander Gordon dated 1653 states that he came over with Mr. Cloise in the _______, Mr. John Atlen, master; was imprisoned with others at Tuttellfield, whence they were redeemed by monies paid by Mr. Dan Stone, of Cambridge 10/15/1652, Alex Gorthing (probably the same), Scotchman, "lately being arrived in New England, was apprenticed to Goodman Stratton, of Watertown, in presence of John Cloyse," &c. Recorded in Middlesex Co. Deeds. (History of Framingham 1640 - 1880)

"To the honored the Deputy Governor with the rest of the magistrates assembled in the County Court now held at Charlestowne this 3rd of the 11th mo 1663. The Petition of Alexander Gordon Scotchman. Humbly Showeth Whereas by the wise providence of the Almighty God your poare petitioner (with many others of his countrymen) was taken prisoner in the late English wars with Scoltand, and with many more prisoners brought into Tottell fields, where and from whence your poare petitioner was redeemed by monies payd by Mr. Daniel Stone of Cambridge, who hath, as appears by his bill given under his hand, freely given your poare petitioner the same, and also wheras Jno. Cloise of Watertowne at the same time moved your petitioner to go along with him by sea to this place without any agreement for time or wages, only his promise to be as a father in all love and kindness to your poare petitioner, and also whereas your poare petitioner obteined his passage by his labour withour any charge to the said Cloise as Mr. Jno Allen the master of the said Ship hath under his hand given, manifesting also his willingness your poare petitioner should have the benefit of the same, also whereas the said Jno. Cloise hath (after faythfull fervice for about a years space performed by your petitioner and hard usage by the wife of the said Cloise) now sould your poare petitioner for seventeen poundes without any recompense or consideration of hispromise made to your petitioner, or the petitioners labor in the ship on on the shoare whereby your poare petitioner apprehendeth himself to be muchwronged, yet being a poare exile and friendless hath been willing to suffer, your petitioner do therefore now humbly Comend the Consideration of the premises to this Honored Court haveing no other reffuge; and your petitioner shal be ready to prove the perticulars above named, and doe Humbly intreate this Honored Court to vousafe the Consideration thereof that so far as justice and equity, according to the laws of God and this Cominwealth, will tend to the releiff of your petitioner, your poare petitioner may receive some help therefrome, And your petitioner shall set down well payd with the determination of this Honored Court and shall continue humbly to pray etc. Alexander Gordon" (New World Immigrants, Vol 1 - Tepper

The book GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY OF MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE, by Sybil Noyes, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, pub. 1972. p.273. A Scotish prisoner of war at Tuthill Fields, London, he was redeemed there by Daniel Stone of Cambridge and came to New England with John Cloyes under verbal agreement, working his passage with Capt. John Allen.

Deported in 1652 to the colonies. He came over on the ship "Liberty", commanded by Capt. James Allen. He arrived at Boston and was confined at Watertown as a prisoner of War. His indenture to Samuel Stratton is dated 19 day 8 months 1652.

However, on May 23, 1655, a number of them, including Alexander, complained of this inevitable outgrowth of bondage and petitioned the General Court of Massachusetts for freedom, but their request was refused..." "Samuel Stratton of Watertown had bought one of these Scotsmen; one Alexander Gordon. It is, of course, an open question whether these men/boys, unable to sign their names, or read, could read the indentures by which they were bound and in this particular case it is clear that Alexander Gordon was a victim of ill treatment."

On November 3, 1663, through the benevolence of a resident of Cambridge, Alexander appealed again to the court in Massachusetts and was released from his contract.

He made his way to Exeter NH. Exeter was founded by John Wheelwright, an exile from Puritan Massachusetts. Apparently it was a drawing point for these early Scottish indentured servents.

Alexander worked for Nicholas Lissen, as a lumberman. Later Alexander married Nicholis' daughter Mary. On 10 October 1664 he was givin an Exeter grant for land.

He is listed as Elicksander Gorden on the 1689 New Hampshire Colonial petition lists. He is also referred to as Allexander Gorthing.

Alexander and Mary's family consisted of,
1, Thomas;
2, Nicholas;
3, John;
4, James;
5, Alexander;
6, Daniel;
7, Elizabeth;
8, Mary.

Alexander died in the summer of 1697


Thomas GORDON and Elizabeth HARRIMAN

Born 1678 in Exeter, New Hampshire.
1, Daniel;
2, Timothy;
3, Thomas;
4, Benoni;
5, Timothy;
6, James;
7, Diana;
8, Abigail;
9, Hannah.
He died 1762.


Daniel GORDON and Susannah SMITH

Born December 01, 1704 in Haverhill, Massachusetts. They had the following children;
1, Daniel;
2, Ithiel;
3, Thomas;
4, Josiah;
5, Susannah.
He died April 16, 1786 in Raymond, Rockingham, New Hampshire.


Thomas GORDON and Deborah SMITH

Born 1740, in Raymond, Rockingham, New Hampshire. Thomas and Deborah had the following children;
1, Eliphalet;
2, Abraham;
3,David;
4, Jonathon;
5, Newel;
6, Daniel;
7, Mary;
8, Anna.
He died July 1826.


Eliphalet Gordon and Unknown

I searched, and found that there were no immigrants to the United States named Eliphalet. I would like to thank Clare and Nancy for helping with some of this information.

I am transcribing Eliphalet's pension file to another documents page.

The census info for 1790 is speculative. The census info for the 1810 and 1820 should match his where-abouts. Since he filed a pension claim from Wilink, Niagara, New York in 1818.

An Eliphalet is listed as being born 175- in NY, and having fought on the NH line during the Revolutionary War.

Another listing states an Eliphalet was born in NH and moved to German Flatts where he married Maria Hauss.

On page 261, 266 and continuing to page 267 of "The History of Rockingham County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens" by Charles A. Hazlett, Richmond-Arnold Publishing Co., Chicago, Ill., 1915:

a) page 261, pay roll of Capt. Samuel McConnel's company, in Colonel David Gilman's regiment, to reinforce the Continental army in New York, Mustered and paid by Colonel John Webster, December 1776, lists an Eliphalet Gordon, (on page 260, Theophilus Lovereign is listed here in April 10 1776).

b) page 266, states that an Ithiel Gorden (Theor Lovering is here also) served in Colonel Nathan HALE's regiment. It further states that Eliphalet Gorden and an Ithiel Gordon Jr served in Captain ROWELL's company, in Colonel Nathan HALE's Regiment. All the above were enlisted from Raymond, Rockingham, NH. There is a William Towle listed here also.

c) page 266 & 267, there is a third listing for 1781. This listing also has Ithiel Gordon, a Theor Loverin and a William Towle, (could these be the same pair that are mentioned in Eunice's claim, below).

The Col. Nathan Hale, who was in command of the 2nd NH Regiment, was from Rindge, NH, he was captured at the Battle of Hubbardton on July 7th, 1777, and eventually died on Long Island, as a POW in 1780. This is not Capt. Nathan Hale who, at 21 years of age, was captured as a spy and hung on September 22 1776.

Eliphalet is listed in Roll Box 46,47, and 50. As GORDEN his name is Elip, Eliph, Elipt, Elipht, Eliphlet, Elipalet, and Eliphalet. As GORDON he is listed as El, Eliph, Elipt, Elipht, and Eliphalet. His name is also spelled Eliphalet GORDEW, GORSTON, and Eliphelet GERDEN, Elipalet GORDERD.

Eliphalet's pension file states he was involved in the battles of Hubbardtown, Pemus Heights, Kingsbridge and Monsmouth, as well as the siege of Yorkstown and the capture of Cornwallis' Army.

June of 1776, the Americans had 1800 men at Kingsbridge. It was the link from northern Manhattan Island to the mainland. In early August the fighting escalated. In September the Americans had 9000 men, under Heath, between Harlem Heights and Kingsbridge. On September 14 Congress ordered Washington to evacuate Manhattan.

May 13th, 1777 he enlisted in Raymond*, Rockingham NH as a private.

July 7th, 1777 The Battle of Hubbardton, in Rutland County VT. The rear guard of General St Clair's army was engaged and captured. Commanded by Colonels Francis, and Warner, 234 American soldiers were taken prisoner (Col. Nathan Hale was in this number).

September 19th, 1777 the British attacked Bemis Heights, and again on October 7th. The British finally surrendered October 17th. It was in Saratoga County NY, on the Hudson River. This is also referred to as the Battle of Freeman's Farm, Saratoga or Stillwater. The American forces were commanded by General Horatio Gates, Benedict Arnold, and Daniel Morgan.

June 28th, 1778 The Battle of Monmouth. This battle took place at Freehold, Monmouth, NJ. American forces were commanded by General George Washington. General Lee, Nathaniel Greene, and Anthony Wayne are also mentioned as other commanders.

July 2nd, 1781 A surprise attack on the British held forts at Kingsbridge. The American attack was not successful, and they retreated to Dobbs Ferry.

Eliphalet was at the Siege of Yorktown, VA. From September 29 through October 19 1781. The 2nd NH regiment was represented by only their light infantry, at this battle.

Eliphalet was furloughed in late 1783.

January 1st, 1785 Eliphalet married Maria HAUSS, born about 1762. Recorded by the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of German Flatts, Herkimer, NY, 974.761 V2K, P 5

4 Sept 1785 a son Garrad born in German Flatts, Herkimer, NY, Garrad was christened 20 Sept 1785 according to records for the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, German Flatts, Herkimer, NY (974.761/GL, V2K #6, P 12). Sponsers were Gerret Van SLYCK and Anna MABEE.

In 1790 there is a Peter GORDON listed on the Erwin district, Ontario county NY census. The Erwin District is what became Steuben county. Both he and his spouse are over 16, making them born before 1774. No listing for the son Garrad however.

In 1802 Genesse was the name of the county. In 1808 Niagara was split off. Then in 1821 Niagara was divided, the portion where "Peter" lived was named Erie. 1823 saw Erie pulled back into Niagara, and finally back to Erie for 1824.

The 1810 census for Willard, Niagara lists a P. GARDEN. When I looked at this on Ancestry.com it looked more like Willink "town" and GORDEN. Males in the house hold are 3 under 10, and 1 over 45. Females are 1 under 10 and a wife 26-44. Eliphalet/Peter is born before 1765, his wife is born between 1766 and 1784. The children, 3 males and 1 female were all born between 1800 and 1810. Willink "town" was formed in 1804.

In 1818 Peter/Eliphalet filed pension, #17028 S 43621, N.H. Line Application 17 Sept. 1818. Aurora, Niagara/Erie, NY. Aged 57or older. Soldier enlisted at Raymond N.H. This would give a birth year of 1761, or earlier.

1820 there is a Peter GORDON listed in the Aurora, Niagara, NY census, Willink was renamed to Aurora in 1818. Listed with 1 male 10-16 and 1 over 45, females 1 under 10 and 1 over 45. Eliphalet/Peter would have been born before 1775, his wife between 1775 and 1794. A male child born 1804/1810 and a female born 1810/1820.

Eliphalet was placed on the pension rolls May 20, 1820. His annual alotment was $96.00. He recieved 1436.79, this works out to be close to 15 years.

Data from Roll M804 Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900, Pension file #S43621.

From his declaration sworn in Niagara County, NY 3 August 1822. He enlisted at Raymond, NH on 13 May 1777. He served in Capt. William Rowell's Company, as part of Col. Nathan Hale's Regiment, and Col. Reed's Regiment, of the New Hampshire Continental Troops. He was discharged at Newburgh, or New Windsor, New York. Among his inventory was a pot and kettle $1.50, 6 teacups and saucers $.25 and a table $1.00. He also held a judgment against E. Ba(?), debtor for $10.00. Eliphalet owed James Sloane, Jonathon Wright, Sam Blake and another man (unable to read name). He was a laborer by profession but he broke his arm and thumb while in service "which still remains weak and I am unable to labor". He had a wife Mary age 38 and her daughter Sally Maria. (Does this mean Sally Maria is not his daughter?)

Eliphalet is living in Mendon, Monroe, NY for 1830, his family is listed as, males, 1, 5-10; 1, 20-30; himself 70-80, females 1, under 5; 1, 5-10; 1, 10-15; and a wife 40-50. Living in a consecutive dwelling is Silas W. GORDEN . Eliphalet is born between 1750-1760, his wife would be born between 1780 to 1790.

Then on the pensioners list for 1835 he is in Niagara county NY.

Lastly in 1840 he is in Rush, Monroe, NY living with an Emery BOWEN. On the census he is listed as 80-90, while on the pensioners side he is listed as 82 years old. Emery's wife is Elizabeth GORDON. This would give a birth year of 1758.

The 1841 pensioners list for New York has Eliphalet Gordon as living in Rush, Monroe, NY. as of June 1 1840. He is living with Emery Bowen. Eliphalet is 82 years old.

There were three requests for copies of his file that were included with the pension papers: One from a Clara E. Sloane of LaCrosse Wisconsin dated 15 June 1904.

Another for a request "will you be kind enough to give me a copy of the record of Eli Gordon, Pension List 1818, Erie Co., NY and send to my address, and by so doing greatly oblige" Jno. Lewis, #2 Oxford Ave. Buffalo NY dated May 25, 1909.

A third was a request from a lawyer John A. Daniels in LaCrosse Wis., dated 19 June 1910. His client {not named} wanted to join the DAR, but couldn't remember if her grandfather was William E. Gordon or Eliphalet W. Gordon. The lawyer contacted the state agency in Albany and found there were 3 William Gordon's enlisted in the American Revolution from New York. (Yet the letter is in Eliphalet's file)

There were two copies of the backs of his pension allotment, both endorsed by Judge Charles Townsend of Buffalo, NY. Also there was a note from Charles Townsend that Eliphalet GORDON was also known as Peter GORDON.

There was no widow's claim for his pension nor was there any information when the pension stopped.

From here down is speculation, and confusion.

The research done in the mid 1800s by G.A. Gordon for NEHGS only gives a birth and parentage for Eliphalet. It further states his wife Hannah Robinson later married a CARR, and died in New Sharon Maine. It does not contain information as to Eliphalet's death.

In 1822 a death pension was granted to an Eliphalet Gordon, NH, BL Wt 10321-100, S 43621, BLW #1054-100, NH line. A daughter Eunice Welch was this soldier's only heir on 10 October 1822, and she was a resident of Rockingham County, NH. This claim was allowed on the service of Eliphalet Gorden, S43621, who was alive in 1836". Notice the claim by Eunice Welch was "allowed" on my ancestors service. Why would this be allowed on 43621's service rather than the proper individual? The complete file is shown on the documents page.

Another thing here is that the addendum which states "soldier was alive in 1836" is in different handwriting (of course). Eliphalet's pension lasted 15+ years, if he started in 1820 and it was discontinued in 1836 (not continuing past 1841 when he was still alive) that adds up to 15 years. Did someone stop his pension because Eunice had received the land also?

If you really look into the Eliphalet Gordon research you don't find all that many. There are possibly 2 Eliphalet Gordons born in this time frame. There is a reference to an Eliphalet on the pay roll of Capt. Samuel McConnel's company, in Colonel David Gilman's regiment, paid by Colonel John Webster, December 1776. Also an Eliphalet Gordon achieved the rank of Seargent in the Revolutionary War. My Eliphalet #43621 was only a Private, and makes no mention of the earlier enlistment. There may also be a discharge from service June 16 1777

On some other individuals, I have found that they recieved pay on a single event basis. Another of my ancestors was paid to drive a wagon of supplies 90 miles out. That is all it says....Could the earlier pay be something like that?

Eastman researchers have an Eliphalet married to Mary Eastman, born about 1740, however Gordon researchers list an Enoch Gordon as the parent of the Eliphalet born in 1778, and in 1801 Mary Eastman became his 3rd wife. After that time there are a few more but they are all too young.

Other Gordon researchers say the Eliphalet Gordon (son of Thomas), married to Hannah Robinson had 2 children, Eunice born 1780 died 1786 and Beniah born 1788 died in 1825. Hannah Robinson later married ____ Carr, she died 1835, in New Sharon ME.

Eunice Welch filed a claim for the bounty land on 10 October 1822 in the Probate Court at Exeter, Rockingham County, NH as she was his daughter and only heir. The file has two depositions, one from William Towl and one from Theophilus Lovering [both from Rockingham] stating they "knew Eliphalet while he was in the service and that they supposed he had been dead for several years." Towl and Lovering also state they enlisted in Capt William Rowell's Company commanded by Col Reed, in the 2nd NH Regt. Further they say Eliphalet was in the same Company and Regiment, and that all 3 of them had enlisted in 1777 for the duration of the war, that all 3 of them had indeed fought until the War ended. They also say Eliphalet was formerly of Raymond NH, and again they suppose Eunice was his only heir. Their statement, supposing he had been dead for several years adds a bit here too, doesn't it.

"Abstracts of Rev War Pension Files" gives the following information: "Gordon, Eliphalet or Eliphalet Gorden S 43621 NH Line - see Eliphalet Gorden." Under that name- Eliphalet Gorden was the following: S 42621, N.H. Line Application 17 Sept. 1818. Under the first name Gordon, E, was also this notice: " Eliphalet, BLW#1054 100 NH Line. It was stated this soldier was deceased in 1822 and this claim was allowed on the service of Eliphalet Gorden S 43621 who was alive in 1836. A daughter Eunice Welsh was soldier's only heir on 10 October 1822, a resident of Rockingham County, NH.

So now we have a land grant for a man "supposedly" dead in 1822, but who was actually alive in 1836. Who is this Eunice Gordon/Welch? The Eliphalet that is the son of Thomas Gordon and Deborah Smith, had a daughter Eunice born 1780. Benaiah Gordon, her brother was still alive in 1822. This would remove "the only heir" status from that Eunice. Or is it possible that Benaiah is not Eliphalet's son?

Eunice's mother may have been Hannah Robinson. She had a second husband ______ CARR, and she died in 1835, at New Sharon, ME. The depositions of Towl and Lovering state that they were in the same company with Eunice's Eliphalet. If you look at my Eliphalet's statement, he was in that same company, at the same time. Lovering is in Roll Boxes 46, 47, and 53 (Theos, and Lovern, Lovring). Towle is in Roll Boxes 44, 46, 47, 52, and 53 (Wm, Willm, and Tole, Towl, Towel. In 1775 each Regiment had 53 enlisted men (privates).

Looking at the 3 requests for pension information clears up some questions. First the Clara E Sloane is Clara Elizabeth Bowen. She is the daughter of Deborah Elizabeth Gordon and Emery Bowen. The request from John Dainels of LaCrosse ties up this loose end. It also looks like it answers the question of another generation between Eliphalet and some of his children. It certainly appears he fathered children up until 1815/16, making him 58 years old. I would imagine we will find a connection between Elzy Sloan and the James Sloan to whom Eliphalet owed money.

Now what to make of the Jno. Lewis in Buffalo NY?

Another thing that has to weigh in here is the 1860 census, Eliphalet's son Silas is refered to as Josiah. He has the right wife and children. Did the census taker know Silas' family, and after a chat about the ancestral home, he inadvertantly used the name of a relative? If Eliphalet is the son of Thomas he had a cousin named Josiah, (the son of Ithiel).


Silas W Gordon and Sibley BOWEN

I have found a Silas W GORDEN listed on the 1830 Mendon, Monroe, NY census. He is 20-30 years old. There is an Eliphalet GORDEN living in a consecutive dwelling.

I have not documented this yet, but there is a possible land deal in Oakfield, NY. It involves a Robert Gordon, and the heirs or agents of a Silas Gordon. The dates mentioned are, purchased in 1838 and sold in 1855. There is an Oakfield, Genesee, NY. Oakfield is midway between Rochester and Buffalo, and about 35 miles east of Lockport. Somerset is north of Oakfield, on the shores of Lake Ontario.

In the 1840 Somerset, Niagara, NY census he may be listed under ----- W. GORDEN (on the ancestry.com you can actually read this as Silas). However he has 2 daughters, one under 5 and one 5-10. I only have found Almira born about 1832, and Mathew is born 1837.

The 1840 census is interesting. A couple lines below Silas W are a William Bowen and Elijah Bowen, his brothers-in-law. A bit further down the page is a Harry (Henry?) Patnum. Silas' sister Sally is married to a Patnum.

Silas and Sybil Gordon owned property in Ray Township, Macomb, Michigan. This property was sold to Amos Bowen around 22 October, 1848.

I finally found him in the 1850 census....Sylus c p Gordon. He is listed in Ray township, Macomb, MI. The household includes Sybil, 47; William Parker, 27; and Almira Parker, 19; then Silas M, 17; Marcus L, 14?; Ira, 11; and, Christopher, 8.

The 1860 Woodstock, Lenawee, MI census is not very positive a Josiah Gordon and his wife Sable, and their children Almira, Ira, Chester, Christopher are listed. Their ages all match up, but who is Josiah? At any rate Silas' son Mathew, his wife Nancy, and their 1st daughter live a couple dwellings prior.

Silas W. and Mathew L. owned land in Ionia co. They are 4-5 miles apart. Mathew is in Odessa twp, and Silas is in Campbell twp.

Land Office Records

county           date      twp   range section acres
Silas W. Ionia 1858/05/01   5N    8W    26     40.00
Silas W Benzie 1869/11/01  25N   15W    24    160.00 

They all moved to Benzie co, MI. Where Silas W, Mathew, and Ira all have proporties. In the 1870 Benzie co census Silas is residing with Chester and Susan.

The 1880 Woodstock, Lenawee, MI shows Almira SCRAMBLIN, her son Walter and her father, Silas GORDON. Almira is a widower, and Silas is widowed. Silas states his parents are both born in NY, while Walter's father was born in MI.


I will try this side by side format where there is more than one ancestor from a common ancestor.

Mathew L Gordon and Nancy Marie EWERS


Mathew L Gordon and Nancy Marie Ewers.

Silas W. and Mathew L. owned land in Ionia co. They are 4-5 miles apart. Mathew is in Odessa twp, and Silas is in Campbell twp.

Land Office Records

county   date     twp range section acres
Ionia  1858/05/01 5N 7W      8      40.00

The 1860 census for Woodstock, Lenawee, MI shows them with a daughter Cynthia. There is also a listing for Norman Ewer 76, I believe this should be 16 and Nancy's younger brother.

Mathew and Nancy had 4 children Cynthia b 1859; Mathew b 1862; Ellen b 1866; and Elizabeth b 1870.

Land Office Records

county   date     twp range section acres
Benzie 1869/11/01 25N 15W    26     160.00

Mathew died December 5 1873, from gangrene that was precipitated by a snake bite.

Ira Gordon Anna Lucretia HILL

I received this photo from Ruthilou, a descendant of Lydia Gordon and Luther Smith.
Family Portrait Clockwise from the upper left: Jim Trumpower, Elsie Gordon Trumpower, Lettie Gordon, Will Gordon, Lydia Gordon Smith, Luther Smith, Josephine Smith, Frank I. Smith, Ira Gordon, Frank Gordon, Nina Gordon Knapp, Anna Hill Gordon, Etta Smith, Charles Smith
Land Office Records

county date twp range section acres
Ira Benzie 1869/11/01 25N 15W 23 160.00

Ira is mentioned in these 2 news paper references.

In the GRAND TRAVERSE HERALD, dated 6 June 1889, for the town of Solon, there is a reference to Ira. Simply stating that " James Good and Ira Gordon were in town Sunday ".

Again in the issue dated 7 November 1889, and in the town of Solon, " Ira Gordon and Frank Boughey have bought a lot of timber from Geo. Yagle, and have commenced to cut it ".

Mathew Silas Gordon and Ida May ARNER

Mathew and Ida had 5 children. Blanche ; Johnny; Lucy Ann; Ella Josephine, and an unnamed child.


This is a post card. It is addressed to Stacey Gordon, and signed by MSG. I think it is Mathew Silas and his son-in-law Frank C Gordon, in the background.


4 genertions, Mathew Silas Gordon, Blanch Gordon, Beverly Gordon, and her 2 children Jack O'Brien and Mike O'Brien

Frank C GORDON and Blanch GORDON

The 1930 census for Precinct 63, Silverbow, Montana list Frank C Gorden, b 1885; Blanch M, b 1887; Beverly O, b 1907; Stacey E, b 1909

A letter written by Frank's daughter Beverly.

Frank was born in Honor Michigan February 1,1885. As a young man he worked in the logging woods in Michigan. He married Blanch Gordon in 1906. They had two children Beverly and Stacey. In 1910 he and his father in law started west following the harvesting crews. Grandfather came back to Michigan in the fall but Frank came on west, ending up in Dillon Montana, where he went to work on the P.&O. Ranch (Poindexter and Orr) He was in charge of the horses there until he decided to come back to Michigan and get his family in 1911. He arrived in time to get the measles from us kids, the hard kind, and was quite sick. As I remember the only thing that tasted good was canned peaches.

Later that spring we all came to Dillon Montana. Dad went back to work at the P.&O. Mother got a job cooking for hay men on the Jones ranch in the Centennial. 81 years later I am well acquainted with one of the Jones of my own age. That fall or winter Dad got a job from John Orr at the Montana Auto Supply. Part of the time teaching new car buyers how to drive.

About 1913 we moved out on the Rattlesnake where Dad took up a homestead, 320 acres. He got out logs and built a two room cabin. We lived a short ways away on the old Rife Ranch during this time, where Mother cooked and Dad worked for them. The first year on the Dry Farm was a good crop year. Barley.

I remember that he was building barbed wire fence on one of the Rife homesteads when we first heard about the outbreak of World War 1 in 1914. We were all out on the fence line as Mother had to help. We stayed on the Homestead for three years, long enough to prove-up on the land. He then leased the Elza Smith ranch on the lower Rattlesnake.

About 1915 or 16 he and a Pete Hansen bought a Threshing Machine, and threshed grain all over the upper Beaverhead Valley for many years. In fact till he moved to Melrose in 1927. Partners changed in the ownership of the Threshing Machine several times. We stayed on the Smith ranch until the spring of 1919.

The winter of 1918-1919 was a terribly hard winter long and very cold and then the hay ran out. A lot of stock was lost. We moved back to Dillon that spring. While living on the Homestead he and 2 or3 neighbors got out logs and built a school house a mile or so across the valley from where we lived.

After we moved back to Dillon he built a dam on Boatman Lake in the upper Rattlesnake above Argenta, so we had irrigation water for some land he had bought next to the Homestead. He then went back to work at the Montana Auto (Orr's Garage).

When they built the new heating plant at the College he got a job hauling the new heating boilers and equipment that was shipped in on the Railroad to the College with the Steam engine (of the threshing machine). After they were installed he got the job of taking care of them as he had a First Class Firemans or Engineers license.

Then in 1927 he decided to try ranching again. Stacey graduated from high school that spring a couple months after the move to Melrose. Dad took over the Lacey place for the State Bank in Dillon. He ranched about 3 years trying first pigs then milk cows then sheep. Then another change when they started to build the old highway through the valley he rented them teams to use on the Freznous ( slips, scrapers what ever ) and then because he could operate one of the first power scrapers he had to try his hand at that, so for a couple years he helped build highways and rented out the ranch or the Bank did.

Then he decided to open a grocery store in Melrose in 1932. The first one was a little building on the highway calling it the Highway Grocery. Business was good so in a short time he bought the old Hecla Mercantile Building and ran a grocery there until 1951. He leased it to Jess Roberts and then sold it to Frank Actis. During this time he also had a slaughter house and raised a lot of hogs. And then a saw mill with a logging operation up Canyon Creek, then a machine shop in part of the building. He put a new hard wood floor in part of the building and had a big dance hall. It was one of the finest floors in the country. Also a bar where the machine shop was later. He built a new house on Hecla Street in Melrose and after he sold the store he had pigs again a couple blocks up the street where he had bought a shop and then he did a lot of wood work and cabinet making, windows, doors and cupboards.

He had gone to Butte on March 31 1960 feeling ok Came home and laid down on the couch and had a heart attack about 5:30 P.M. and passed away in just a few minuets. Jack of All Trades Master of none. I often wonder if he ever found anything that was ever a satisfaction to him. Logger, River man, Harvester, Stockman, Mechanic, Rancher, Engineer, Construction worker, Dairy man, Sheep man, Store keeper, Carpenter, Cabinet maker, Machinist, Business man, Butcher, Sawmill operator.

My Mother passed away in February of 1935 at the Barrett Hospital in Dillon, Montana and was buried in Mountain View Cemetery. One of the last things she said to me before she died was "don't ever take me back to Melrose".

Dad Married Ada Jones ( the old ----- ) about a year later. When he died she got all the property and ever thing he had. When she died she left the property to her nephew and niece.


The man on the left is my great grandfather. He is Frank C Gordon. This photo was taken in Melrose Montana.

Some sort of Clan Gordon Festivity

Land Office Records

county date twp range section acres
Frank C Beaverhead 1918/11/05 7S 9W 17, 20 

Hauling the boiler to the Dillon MT High School.

Blanch Gordon and Frank C GORDON


Blanch Gordon married her nephew Frank C Gordon.

Stacey Gordon and Wilma OLMSTEAD


Stacey Gordon


Frank Gordon and Zoe NELSON

This is me showing my dad a thing or two about achieving proper torque on a lug nut.


I will try to scare up some more pictures for these pages. I know some of you wont be happy until I add a picture of a gorilla.....